Casa de Fados, Restaurant "A Baiuca" in Alfama

“A Baiuca” in Alfama is one of those unique places that strives to keep up the true spirit of “Fado Vadio”. Working both as a restaurant and casa de fados, the staff offer, alongside the catering, unique amateur Fado performances. In “A Baiuca” you can taste and enjoy some typical cuisine, the prices are not expensive and the atmosphere is amazing, sharing the space with both locals and tourists. Our advice is to arrive early for dinner, else, is perfectly fine to stay outside during summer. ...

Belém

Around “Belém” quarter you can grasp the atmosphere of 16 century Lisbon, prime of the maritime “discoveries” era. Stroll near the river, either walking or on bike, and marvel at the “Padrao dos descobrimentos”, cross the main avenue and check the “Centro Cultural de Belém”, main place for cultural events and exhibitions. Next, the naval Museum, a definitive must, following by the most impressive “Mosteiro dos Jeronimos. Last, a visit enjoy a marvelous “Pastel de Belém” right in its birth place. ...

Bar Trobadores, a medieval tavern in Lisbon downtown

In Lisbon downtown “Baixa” area, toward the Terreiro do Paco lies a different place with wood benches, light candles in chandeliers and various other decorative elements, perfectly recreating a medieval tavern. While listening to Celtic, folk or traditional Portuguese music drink beer in horns or earthenware mugs, try unusual potions, such as cider, hydromel or mead, while gained a plate of cheeses and sausages or snuggling a bowl of “caldo verde”. ...

Ruines of Carmo convent

Carmo’s Convent and Church are the maximum exponent of gothic architecture in the city of Lisbon. It’s construction started in 1389, along a ridge of sandy terrain, making its construction work time-consuming and expensive enterprise. For many years the Church was the biggest of Lisbon, formed by a complex structure of five chapels, but almost fully collapsed with the 1755 earthquake and the fire that followed. After the fire, the root collapsed and only two main façades of the Church remained. ...

Castelo de Sao Jorge and Torre de Ulisses

Castelo de Sao Jorge: The Castelo de S. Jorge National Monument occupies a privileged area of the old medieval citadel and consists of the castle, ruins of the former royal palace and part of the neighborhood for the élite. The fortification, built by the Moors in the mid-11th century, was the last defensive stronghold for the élite who resided on the citadel, the Moorish governor whose palace was nearby, and the élite city administrators whose homes are visible today in the Archaeological Site. ...

Aguas Livres Aqueduct

Considered one of the most remarkable works of the hydraulic engineering ever made and one of the rare and more complex water supply systems of the eighteenth century preserved until the present time. Started in 1732 works Were Concluded only about a hundred years later around 1834. The Aguas Livres Aqueduct was destined to the water supply of the new fountains Whose net grew wider, since it Were adduced water springs, located near to Sintra, to the reservoir of the Mae d’agua visitable near Amoreiras. ...

Lisbon 1755 Earthquake and Tsunami

On November 1, 1755 the combination of earthquake, tsunami and firestorm devastated Lisbon on All Saint’s Day, turning buildings into deathtraps and transforming the streets of the capital into a hellish landscape. Experience the disaster through the eyes of one of its survivors see how this event brought an empire capital to its knees. An 8.5 magnitude earthquake with epicenter only 150 miles from the cost undid the city buildings, prompting tens of thousands of people to flee to the riverside, where a tsunami with waves of up to 15 meters killed them. ...